Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Live Streaming the Muncaster Castle Embroidery Tour Tomorrow UPDATED AGAIN

Philippa Trunbull of The Crewel Work Company does tours of British embroidery each year but this year is going to be special. Tomorrow, October 1, Philippa is going to live stream her visit to the embroideries of Muncaster Castle in England's Lake District.  Here are the times and a few details including a link to a history of the Pennington family and their castle.
http://www.needlenthread.com/2014/09/muncaster-castle-embroideries-coming-live.html

Mary Corbet promises more information today.  I'll post the link here when it publishes.  Stay tuned and set your clocks for tomorrow!  UPDATE:  Here's the link to the streaming video for tomorrow.
http://www.needlenthread.com/2014/09/unveiling-embroidery-treasures-from-muncaster-castle.html

UDATE #2 - The video is no longer available.  Mary Corbet hopes it will be made available but we don't know whether it will be yet.

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 28, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Where to Find HP Designs

The interview with Frank Hyatt has prompted lots of questions about where to find HP Designs canvases. Of course you should start with Frank's HP Design website which has the leftover stock of designs that weren't picked up elsewhere.
http://www.hpneedlepoint.com/index.html

Frank also has an eBay store which has some real bargains.  Search eBay for the seller hpdesigns to see what temptations Frank has ready for purchase.

Julia's Needleworks has quite a few of Frank's beauties for sale, especially among the classic African and floral areas Frank did so well.
http://needleworks.ehclients.com/index.php/gallery-HPDesigns/category-2014/C290/

Amanda Lawford went for the classics, particularly the Asian and flower patterns and the animals with oriental rug borders.  She also picked up some of the lacquer boxes (second link).
http://www.amandalawford.com/artists/HP.html

http://www.amandalawford.com/products/boxes.html

Barbara Russell also chose animals and Asian designs but her website doesn't have the HP Designs pieces in one section.  You'll have to browse to find them, which is no problem.  Barbara's site is a delight to explore.
http://barbararusselldesigns.com/browse.html

I hope you find one of Frank's beauties to stitch and treasure.  Thanks again, HP Designs!  It was great while it lasted.

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 29, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Monday, September 29, 2014

How to Needle Felt a Tiger's Tail

Things have been hectic in Chilly Hollow in August and September, what with Destination Dallas deadlines, a vacation, and more. So I am late talking about needle felting on needlepoint canvas. Sorry!

But I knew you'd wait patiently just to find out how one needle felts a needlepoint canvas.  I'm using my coaster sized Timeless Tiger from Leigh Designs' new Imari series to explore needle felting and then report back to you.  I'm doing this as a model for Leigh so there will eventually be a stitch guide that has full instructions for this particular piece.  The things I've learned while working this piece will work for any canvas you want to needle felt, though.

If you've not read my previous articles on needle felting, they are collected here.
http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com/p/needle-felting-needlepoint-canvas.html

I used a single felting needle and the foam type felting block.  I took my canvas off stretcher bars but you don't have to do that.  I thought it would be easier to reach the various parts of the tiger if the bars weren't in the way.

Holding the Roving in Position

I started with the tail.  This is a narrow, curving area so I used a single needle since the multiple needle felting tools won't work here.  To needle felt, pinch off a small amount of the wool roving.  By small, I mean a nickel -ized piece that is thin enough you can see through it.  It will be wider than the tail but that's ok.  Just fold it in half to make it approximately the right width. Hold it in place with the fingers of one hand while you needle felt it with the other.   I started at the outside edge of the design but where you start doesn't really matter.  Lay the wool roving on the tail and poke it with the needle into the center of the tail, moving up and down perpendicular to the canvas.  (Holding the felting needle at an angle makes it easier to break.)  Remember to watch what you are doing so you don't poke your fingers with the needle!

Afraid of splitting your needlepoint canvas threads?  Don't be.  Practice poking the roving first with a regular tapestry needle.  You will notice that if you hit a thread, the needle will slide down into a hole.  This also happens with the barbed and sharp felting needle as long as you are not whaling the tar out of your canvas.  In other words, take your time.  Speed is not your friend here.

After you think your wool roving is stuck to the canvas somewhat, pinch off another bit of wool roving.  Fold it to fit and lay it on the tail, making sure it overlaps the first piece of roving.  Now use the felting needle again.  Once the second piece is felted, you can start to move the needle nearer the edge of the tail.  At this point, you can angle the needle and poke the wisps that are laying over the tail margin into the tail area.  Go slowly.  

Repeat this process up and down the tail, adding another pinch of wool roving as needed.  This will take far longer than basketweaving the tail but I think of it as doing background.  It takes time but is worth the effort.  To check that the wool roving is secure, flip the canvas over.  You will see the fuzz on the back side.  Like this--


Wool Roving on the Back Side
When you are happy with the look of the tail, check to see if there are any wisps of roving sticking up or out.  Poke those into position with the needle felting tool or trim them with sharp scissors.  You can use the needle to push down into the edge of the tail at an angle which helps secure it but go slowly as angled pokes are more likely to break the needle.

The final step is to stem stitch the stripes on top of the wool roving using a sharp needle.  It's really just like stem stitching on top of an already stitched area.  The sharp needle helps the thread go through the wool roving smoothly.

Next time I'll talk about needle felting the tiger's back and starting his face.

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 26, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Needle Keeper

Need a wooden needle keeper necklace?
http://www.needlenthread.com/2014/09/monogrammed-needle-keeper.html 

This unique item comes from Akerworks in Tennessee.
http://www.akerworks.com/magnetic-needle-keepers.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 15, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Sunday, September 28, 2014

Needlepoint Leaves for the Chapel

I stumbled across this article about a sculpture with needlepoint leaves intended for the University of Maryland's Memorial Chapel recently. Of course I don't remember who told me about it, but it is a wonderful example of ecclesiastical embroidery, 21st Century style. 
http://www.diamondbackonline.com/news/campus/article_d5ad40ac-ef61-11e2-90d5-0019bb30f31a.html?mode=jqm

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 24, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

The Blackwork Journey

Thanks to Jan's blog I discovered The Blackwork Journey, Elizabeth Almond's website that has a free blackwork design called "Save the Stitches" being uploaded in sections.  The link below shows other free blackwork patterns, too.
http://www.blackworkjourney.co.uk/freebies1.shtml

If you like using blackwork patterns on your needlepoint, this is a wonderful resource!

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 15, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Saturday, September 27, 2014

A Visit with Frank Hyatt

Recently I fell into correspondence with Frank Hyatt of HP Designs.   Those of you who are in the business know that Frank retired recently, selling the rights to some of his designs and lacquered boxes to other designers.  He also maintains a website to sell off the remainder of his inventory of painted canvases and boxes if you want one last chance to grab a memento of HP Designs.
http://www.hpneedlepoint.com

Frank is a wonderful correspondent.  He also was kind enough to tell me a bit about his career and allow me to share it with you here.  Thanks, Frank!  You have worn many hats in the needlepoint business, and what you have to share is fascinating to those of us who are just regular stitchers.

So let me introduce Frank Hyatt, who will make you laugh and make you think.

************************************************


 I will try to be short and to the point.

Many people know me in association with Gene Plummer who was both my business and life partner for 25 years.  Although many think that HP stands for hand-painted it actually is the first letters of our last names Hyatt and Plummer.  The fact that he is no longer with us is one of the reasons I’m quitting the business—it’s just not as much fun.  

We fell into retail needlepoint as a means to move back to San Francisco from Portland where we had moved in 1991.  I never really acclimated to the Northwest so when Gene’s brother called and jokingly offered us a needlepoint store I jumped at the chance; Gene, however, was less certain.  He claimed that in consideration of our ignorance about all things needlepoint it would not be a smart move.  I, on the other hand, countered that we were both English Lit majors and didn’t know a lot about anything but it hadn’t stopped us from doing dumb things before and it shouldn’t now.  My logic won the day and we moved back to San Francisco to become operating partners of “Elaine Magnin Needlepoint” in 1994.

As I mentioned, both of us were completely ignorant about needlepoint--our only previous experience was purchasing a printed kit from Michael’s as a gift for Gene’s sister-in-law.  Ironically, I remember being underwhelmed at the images and shocked at the prices—seemed like a whole lot of nothing for a whole lot of money.  I was equally confounded as to how a woman who lived in Pacific Heights and was on the board of the San Francisco Opera could derive any pleasure from such a pedestrian and old-fashioned hobby.  Only later did we understand our gaffe--Gene’s sister-in-law was an avid stitcher of hand-painted needlepoint and a good customer of Elaine Magnin Needlepoint.  After 30 odd years, Elaine retired and sold the store to Gene’s brother Gayle who, over the years,  had watched his wife spend large amounts on needlepoint and (against her advice) decided that owning a needlepoint store would be a sound investment.  Only later did he learn how much time and money would be required to make his investment profitable at which point he decided to close the doors.   Thus, he called one day and in the ensuing conversation offered the store to us.  

Whatever I thought needlepoint was quickly vanished my first day in the shop.  The shop was tiny--only 220 square feet--and traditional.  Thread-wise, it only stocked Paternayan wool, DMC cottons, and Balger in silver and gold--but design-wise, the shop had hundreds of unbelievably beautiful hand-painted canvases by the likes of Jane Aurich, Joy Juarez, Melissa Shirley, Kate Molineaux, Gay Giannini,  Dede Ogden, Amanda Lawford, Julie Poitras, and so many more.  I had never seen hand-painted needlepoint designs before and I was definitely impressed by both the artistry and the prices.  I momentarily regretted my fool-hardy rush to become a purveyor of needlepoint--I was prepared to peddle $30 kits as sold at Michael’s but $900 canvases--what on earth was I thinking!  I dismissed my doubts, bought some new clothes and decided I would cross the sales bridge if I ever came to it--I was yet to be convinced that anyone spent that kind of money on a product that, no matter how beautiful, required the additional expenses of threads, time, and fabrication. Besides, the designs that I saw were the ones that hadn’t sold not the ones that had. 

Very quickly I learned how to basket weave.  I read the “bible” by Jo Christiansen and taught myself many of the stitches plus learned as much trade jargon as I could absorb.  Fortunately, when it comes to selling it is far more important to sound knowledgeable than actually be knowledgeable--knowing the difference can buy one the time to become both.  Under the guidance of Mark Parsons we modernized EMN into a boutique needlepoint store--with thousands of designs and over fifty different fiber lines.  In addition, we started to sell antiques and accessories suitable for needlepoint finishing--I have never seen a surface that I didn’t think about slapping some needlepoint on.   Eventually we found the lacquered boxes and began to retail them as well.  When we sold the shop and went into wholesale the boxes were already a proven product so we quite naturally took them with us--although, the price point did change significantly. 

A word about business plans--although boxes and canvases don’t appear to go together, the underlying logic is, as in all things, form and function.   People will always do needlework of some sort (think of poor old Penelope stitching by day and unraveling by night) providing a utilitarian use for the stitched piece is always helpful.  It is currently the fashion to treat needlepoint as art but, needle-pointers should never forget that, in addition to repelling unwanted suitors, it is also useful as rugs, upholstery, clothing and shoes, etc— all one needs do is tour castles in Europe to see the practical uses for needlepoint. 

After acquiring the store I became “addicted” and stitched dozens of needlepoints most of which I gave away or used as shop samples.  I learned the hard way that needlepoint is best done for oneself and not as gifts to be given to others--eyes light up at  $50 coffee makers but $500 pillows cause wtf looks of bewilderment--for needlepoint there is Visa but for expressions of  surprise and confusion priceless.   Because of the constraints of our small shop, we didn’t hold classes so I memorized stitches from Jo Christiansen’s “bible” and gave individual lessons at point of sale.  I would quickly write stitch charts and then show the customer how to do the stitch in the margin of the canvas.  Of course we stocked various stitching books especially the ones which organized stitches according to use.  Provided one is patient and willing it is not that difficult to turn ordinary basket-weave stitchers into competent and sophisticated needle-workers.     

I am not sure if you were a customer of mine at EMN but if you shopped the online store in the late 1990’s you were.  We started the online store and sold it along with the brick and mortar to Alan Ferrara 2001.  Sadly, Alan went out of business a few years ago and a 50 year tradition in San Francisco disappeared.   

Initially, when we started HP Designs we purchased designs from other artists--Wendy Rayment, Molly Fehrenbach, and a few others—but, eventually, I became the primary designer for our wholesale line.  Our design aesthetic was a continuation of what we had stocked in the shop--florals, animals, geometrics, oriental, Christmas, etc.  I always designed by category and what was most likely to sell, not what pleased me--good thing too, my tastes run toward dark and morbid.   In retail Gene did most of the buying and later he was the primary arbitrator of what designs we wholesaled. He always chose designs that he thought would have sold in the store and he was usually correct.  

All of the designs, whether mine or from others, are all painted by various painting services operating in the industry.   The boxes are hand-poured and produced in China.  The painting services are either the best or worst kept secrets in the industry but everyone uses them.  If you have ever painted a canvas, even a small one, you know how time consuming it is, and when you think of how much needlepoint is sold every year at the shows you soon realize that the designer and artist is not necessarily the painter.  Artist, designer, and painter are three separate and distinct categories--to find a canvas design which is the product of all three in one person is a rare and expensive item.

Hand-painted needlepoint is primarily an American phenomena and has never really caught on elsewhere in the world.  Elaine Magnin who began the store was one of the architects of American style needlepoint.  Elaine, along with many other retailer/designers trained and hired artists to paint for them.  That is not to say that there were no designer/artists wholesaling in the 50’s, 60’s, and 70’s (there were a few) but in those decades the European print and pre-work companies still dominated.   Only with the establishment of off-shore painting services in the 80’s did the American needlepoint industry blossom into what it is today.  The historical perspective is important, not only because it is so recent, but because it shows a prevailing trend in the evolution of the needlepoint industry—specialization.

Like everything else in modern life needlepoint too has undergone specialization --fifty years ago the shop-owner wore almost all of the hats--retailer, designer, painter, teacher, finisher etc.  Today these are all separate and distinct jobs within the industry--today one does not need to design, paint, or stitch in order to sell needlepoint.  In fact, many needlepoint designs start as “art,” get adapted to needlepoint  by a “designer,”  painted onto canvas by someone overseas,  sold here in a combo needlepoint/knitting store, interpreted by a stitch designer then stitched with specialty threads by the buyer who then takes it to another expert to finish.  I am not complaining merely stating the obvious--when the pie is split between so many no one ever gets full.  For a fact it is getting harder to make a living at needlepoint.   If you have attended the trade shows for a number of years then you too have seen many people come and go-- talented people who brought an original and classic design sense to market but were unable to stay due to the strong competition for so few dollars.   It would be interesting to know how much in total sales a market actually does and how it has changed over the years; based on the turnover of designers, I would guess it is relatively stable (or stagnant-depending on if you are a glass half full or a glass half empty person).

To me it is clear, specialization within the needlepoint industry has brought about a flowering of the needlepoint craft into an art form.   One only needs to see the work of stitch designers and their pupils to understand that American style needlepoint is more than hand-painted canvases.  I hate to be the one to state the obvious but in a world in which everyone is an artist art tends to lose its meaning or least its mystery and as a result its value.  End users (retail customers) of hand-painted needlepoint designs now want and expect a quality and complexity of goods and services that is increasingly difficult for many in the supply chain to keep up with and make a profit.  Unfortunately (for sellers), there is a limit to what end-users will ultimately pay for their hobby.  My guess is that in the future the various specialties in needlepoint will need to be concentrated into fewer hands.  Ironically, we will go full circle to how it used to be—the shop-owner wearing all the hats.   This will happen one of two ways designers will become retailers or retailers will become designers.  

For all my pessimism, I want to end by saying that I have no regrets being involved in an industry in which all involved, whether sellers or buyers, are less interested in money and more intent on expressing themselves artistically, whether with paint and brushes or threads and needles.     

Frank Hyatt

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 15, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Vicky's in Love--Again UPDATED

I know just how Vicky DeAngelis feels as I have a new favorite thread or color about every other day.  Vicky's head over heels with the new silk ribbon from Planet Earth Fiber.  Here is what she says about it.
http://mostlyneedlepoint.com/im-in-love-yet-again-2/

UPDATE:  More about this ribbon, including great photos of the three sizes:  4mm, 7mm and 10mm
http://mostlyneedlepoint.com/finishing-up/

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 13, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Friday, September 26, 2014

Nimble Needle (Atlanta) Newsletter

Nimble Needle's quarterly newsletter just keeps getting better!   My favorite part is all the fabulous finishing from their talented customers, but you may love the leaf stitch diagram, or the photos of the new Brenda Stofft canvases, or be intrigued by Gingher's Stitch Blade or the new Stitcher's Compact. Have fun browsing all that Needle Bug has to offer.
http://us1.campaign-archive2.com/?u=45d1a2a693824b7bef0df6f6c&id=e209ae1d50&e=6413033b0f

UPDATE:  My apologies to both Nimble Needle in Atlanta and Needle Bug in Montgomery for getting their shops mixed up when I posted this.  Can you tell my mind is on other things?  I have cataract surgery in a week and it is starting to show despite my attempts to keep my personal life off Blog!

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 19, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Sylvia Sidney

I am a big fan of Sylvia Sidney's needlepoint books, so when I found this profile of her life, I wanted to share it.
http://moviemorlocks.com/2009/02/04/sylvia-sidney-paid-by-the-tear/

Here is her first book.  It's the best in my opinion--full of personal charm, not stitch diagrams.
http://www.amazon.com/Sylvia-Sidney-needlepoint-book/dp/0883652552

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 10, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Thursday, September 25, 2014

I Haven't Forgotten

Timeless Tiger from Leigh Designs' Imari Series (coaster size)

No, I haven't forgotten the Imari tiger and the needle felting tutorial I promised. I have just been very busy with Real Life things, plus the small Imari Tiger has been on a trip.  The piece went to Destination Dallas to wow the shop owners.   However he's back at his lair and I have started working on the piece again.  Expect the needle felting tutorial to pick up again next week.  Until then, the photo above shows the coaster sized Imari Timeless Tiger as he appeared at Destination Dallas.

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 24, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Marianne's Worst Ever Book Review

New Needlepoint dot com is one of three well-known needlepoint book sellers online. Marianne's reviews are fascinating. When I am bored or killing time I often go to her website and read a few reviews of books I own, I might like to own, or in this case, a book I wouldn't give to my worst enemy.   (However if you need the perfect gag gift for your guild Christmas party, let Marianne know.)
http://www.newneedlepoint.com/content-product_info/product_id-2403/handbook_of_needlepoint_stitches_by_mary_meister_walzer.html

Keep up the good work, Marianne.  I almost hurt myself falling out of the chair laughing.  Bet you sell this, too.  Someone is bound to want to see this turkey for themselves!

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 19, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

The Cruel Jacobean

Actually my title is a fake but I can't resist a fun title!  I should have typed something about the difference between crewel embroidery and Jacobean crewel, because that's how Ruth Kern starts out her monthly blog posting. For those who don't know, Ruth is one of the premiere stitching book sellers on the planet.  Her monthly blog showcases the books she has in stock, and they are always educational.  Because Ruth knows her customer, this month's posting covers a great deal more than crewel!  I won't say more--some folks think I've said too much already--but I encourage you to spend a little time with Ruth.  You will learn something and she'll make you think.
http://ruthkernbooks.blogspot.com/2014/09/september-blog-come-on-in-hope-you.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 8, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

Needle Nicely Looks Back

If you want to learn a little bit about the history of Mary Agnes' shop, don't miss her latest blog posting! 
http://needlenicely.blogspot.com/2014/09/on-road-again.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 17, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Saving Inspirations

Lately there has been a lot of publicity about the financial position Inspirations magazine is in. If they don't increase their subscriber base, they are going to go out of business. To me personally this means nothing as I don't subscribe to embroidery magazines and can't pick up a copy locally anyway. Plus it's not needlepoint so I wasn't going to mention it, but that was before I read the eloquent plea Hazel Blomkamp makes for keeping Inspirations alive in this digital age.  I think you might want to read and ponder what Hazel has to say.  It applies to the world of needlepoint, too.  After all, we need to keep the American Needlepoint Guild alive and well.
http://therebelliousneedlewoman.blogspot.com/2014/09/the-digital-age-and-embroidery-magazines.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 8, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Another Charley Harper Exclusive

Enriched Stitch is having a Charley Harper trunk show and for the third time this year, a CH trunk show has an exclusive new canvas being introduced. If you are a fan of Charley or of dogs, you'll want to see this. 
http://astheneedleturns.com/exclusive-charlie-harper-canvas/

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 22, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Football Just Got More Interesting

The Alabama-Southern Mississippi game got a lot more interesting when this little blurb showed Serendipity Needleworks!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C82a6eqsdOQ&index=1&list=UUtA8Q2iDophab5LjguAnAgA

The shop's in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, by the way.  Drop in and talk football, needlepoint and other fun things.
http://www.serendipityneedleworks.com/Store/pc/home.asp

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 14, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Monday, September 22, 2014

Mindy Goes Abstract

If you are a fan of intricate pattern or abstracts, you'll want to explore some of Mindy's canvases.  Nimble Needle in New Jersey has showcased several of Mindy's colorful pieces in various styles on their blog, which is worth reading.
http://thenimbleneedle.blogspot.com/2014/09/mindy-pattern-color-and-complexity.html

If you are not familiar with Mindy's work, please visit her website for an enjoyable browse.  Mindy owns a shop as well as designing, so you can order directly from her if your local shop doesn't stock her work.
http://www.mindysneedlepoint.com

 Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 6, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

I Want to Borrow Kathy's Dad

When you see all the work Kathy's dad did to make her floor stand more stable so she could use slate frames on them, you will want to borrow him, too! 
http://www.theunbrokenthread.com/blog/2014/09/03/a-better-stand-thanks-to-dad/

Slate frames are large and heavy.  You can see one being set up here by Mary Corbert.
http://www.needlenthread.com/2008/07/dressing-slate-frame-for-embroidery.html

Here is the NeedleNeeds website in case you wish to explore their floor stands.  This is a United Kingdom company, by the way, which is why they aren't a familiar name to needlepointers in the States.
http://www.needleneeds.co.uk/store/needlework-stands-frames/10-necessaire-floor-stand.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 3, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Evolution of a Design

Kimberly is creating a new piece, which apparently will be called "Dream Glimpse."  It is fascinating to see how Kimberly's drawings start to take on a life of their own as a painted canvas.  Often she stitches a piece as well, which adds yet another dimension.
http://akimberlydesign.blogspot.com/2014/09/sensing-trend-here.html

Kimberly is also working on Blossom.
http://akimberlydesign.blogspot.com/2014/09/stitch-by-stitch.html

Wish I could draw!

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 14, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Pet Portraits

Ridgewood Needlepoint is having a Valentina Heishmann trunk show, so today on their blog they showed off her dog and cat designs, which are amazing!   If you like realistic animal portraits, don't miss this.
http://ridgewoodneedlepoint.blogspot.com/2014/09/valentina-heishmann-designs-trunk-show_6.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 6, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Book Review: Stitches a' la Carte

Stitches a' La Carte Is Tote Bag-Sized
Lynda Richardson's new book sold out at the Destination Dallas market and there's a good reason for that--it's a charmer!  The book is called Stitches a' la Carte.  It's a ninety-three page spiral bound book.  As you can see from the photograph above, it's not a big book.  But it is packed with diagrams of background stitches, designed to be stitched in mostly tent stitches using light coverage, i.e., a thinner thread than usual so that the background shows through the stitches. There are a few diagrams that are straight stitches over one thread done in a horizontal or vertical direction and 1-2 that are long stitches.

Two Random Pages From the Book

None of the diagrams are numbered which is a deal-breaker for some folks, but Lynda says this was a deliberate decision so that folks would experiment with the stitches and adapt them to their own style.     I found the diagrams easy to read.  Most are black and white although at least one has gray stitches to point out where a repeat starts.  In other words, if you are color blind, you won't have a problem reading the diagrams.

Some of the stitches are quite complex patterns as you can see from the glimpse inside the book I posted above. If you have trouble counting out complicated patterns you may not like this book, but I can't count to five reliably and I love it!  It would be worth the pain to work out the repeats to have such lovely stitches in my backgrounds for me.  I should point out I picked some of the most complicated stitches I could find, just to show you the worst you'll have to cope with should this book end up in your stitching library.  Erin posted another stitch on her Needlepoint Land blog, by the way.  You can see it here.  Lynda is stitching a fabulous parrot canvas from Georg James (distributed by Alice Peterson), by the way.
http://needlepointland.com/2014/09/04/the-red-parrot/

I bet the stitches above are stunning stitched.  Very few of the stitches are ones I have seen before, so if you collect unusual stitches or always need background stitch ideas, this is a Must Buy book.  Some of the denser stitches will probably work in smaller areas, but I think most of the patterns will need space to show off, so they are really more suitable for large areas.

But diagrams are not all that is inside this little book.  There are vignettes of Lynda's stitching life, things she learned from friends and family or discovered at one of the many trade shows she's attended over the years.  Lynda is the owner of Dream House Ventures, you see, the distributor of painted canvases from folks like Cricket Collection or Fiori Designs, and the creator of many fine threads like the skein of Baroque Silk in the photo above to help give you an idea of scale.  They also have the wonderful Soy Luster, perfect for variegated hair or fur, and the gorgeous Empress Elite cashmere/silk blend.
http://www.dreamhouseventures.com

After I wrote this but before it published, Vicky DeAngelis also did a short review of Lynda's book, which I've linked to here to help you make up your mind if this is a book for you.
http://mostlyneedlepoint.com/so-whats-new-2/

Lynda often stitches models for the designs she distributes so I suppose it was inevitable she would want to share some of the lovely stitches she has created.  But that isn't all that is inside the book.  Every few pages there is a little vignette from Lynda's life.  You will get glimpses of things she learned from trade shows, her family or her friends, shared generously along with all those beautiful background stitches. Lynda will come alive as you read.  The book has places for you to list the gifts you've received from your needlepoint as well, making this a book that could become very personal indeed.

For a long time I've been sorry the stitch dictionaries we have available today are so sterile.  Most never give you a glimpse of the author, unlike the great books by Sylvia Sidney or Mary Martin I so loved when I first taught myself needlepoint. I use the stitch dictionaries all the time, mind, but I long to have a bit more besides lots of diagrams.  Yes, I am a romantic--I want to see the stitcher who went to so much trouble to diagram those stitches for me.

Stitches a' la Carte is a book with heart as well as some fabulous background stitches.  I plan to treasure my copy and use it often.

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 17, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

ANG Seminar Exhibit 2014: Arlene's Rhododendrons

Because one of this year's ANG Exhibit winners is a friend of mine, I persuaded her to write a bit about the silk gauze piece she submitted which won not only a first place ribbon but the Small Masterpieces Award!  Arlene Cohen generously wrote about her award winner at ANG, and also let me know she won Piecework's contest this year for the needlework category.  Plus she has been to Winterthur with an exhibit she thinks some of Blog's readers might enjoy.  Thanks, Arlene!  We can't wait to see what you stitch and exhibit next year.

Let me turn Blog over to Arlene....


Rhododendrons, By Arlene Cohen

*****************************************************

"Some pictures are attached for my piece that I submitted to the ANG exhibit this year. I've also sent the statement I wrote; I know these are not required for non-original pieces, but I loved the opportunity to simply write out the background and inspiration for doing this piece. Two years ago, when Seminar was in Philadelphia, I was able to drive down for a few hours to see the Exhibit (and bookstore and such). I LOVED that artist statements were sitting out by the pieces and for any piece, I could pick up the paper and read through the background. I don't know if this is a regular practice at Seminar Exhibits (I hope it is!), but I so wish more of those words could be/would be published as part of the December issue of NeedlePointers. Frankly, what I REALLY wish is that everything, pictures of pieces and artist statements were available online, at the same time that folks are able to see them in person, during Seminar week, but I know that will never happen. Anyway, feel free to use these pictures and words in anyway you wish.



Artist Statement:   Rhododendrons

Perhaps it was the very long winter. Perhaps it was the endless snow shoveling to dig out my car again and again. Perhaps it was the frustration of plans constantly changing, constantly relying on their “snow date” options. But, more so than ever, I was anxious for spring and for the bloom of flowers and the signs of renewal.
During the late winter/early spring months, as snow was finally melting, but the landscape was barren, my eyes lit on an issue of a cross stitch magazine in a store. On the front cover was a picture of a delightful design called “Rhododendrons.” These blue-violet flowers were in just the palette of colors that most attracts my eye. And the image of flowers, of spring, were exactly right for the moment. Putting aside plans for what was to be my next project, I decided this design was exactly what was needed.
Designed by Lesley Teare in the UK, this pattern was published in Cross Stitch Gold issue #41 (US version; UK versions of the magazine are numbered differently as I have learned). It was designed for 14 or 18 count cross stitch on fabric. But, my desire was to do it a little differently, to preserve the delicate feelings as we marched closer and closer to spring and flowers in bloom, by working this design on a small scale. I chose 40 count silk gauze as my ground material and used tent stitches instead of cross stitches. Since the palette of colors is what first drew me to the design, I did not change any of the called for DMC floss colors.
I will be glad to have these bouquet of flowers in view when next winter comes around.


Next, I wanted to share another little win in my world. Piecework Magazine runs a contest, seemingly every other year. The theme this year was Words in Needlework (I think inspired by a pair of old knitted gloves with Bible verse in them, featured in an issue in the past year or so). I won first place for the Needlework category with a piece I created featuring the poem by John Taylor from 1637 titled "In Praise of the Needle." The five first place winners are featured in the Sept/Oct 2014 issue, likely available right about now in stores (I know I can pick it up in my local Barnes and Noble) and can be seen here:
http://www.interweave.com/needle/piecework_magazine/contests/2014-words-in-needlework-winners.asp

Last, perhaps to share with readers sometime soon: yesterday, I traveled down to the Winterthur in Deleware. The big publicity from them in the past months has been the exhibit of costumes from Downton Abby (perhaps you mentioned this on your blog? don't remember, saw it in so many places). But, opening just last week was an exhibit on needlework, titled 'The Diligent Needle: Instrument of Profit, Pleasure, and Ornament.'   Lovely pieces, interesting background, and the ability to purchase a booklet of the entire exhibit (pictures of pieces and all signage) for $8 - not bad! I liked the organization of the exhibit into four areas: Diligence, Profit, Pleasure, and Ornament.

The introduction sets up the whole exhibit: 'For centuries, instruction in needlework was an important part of the a young woman's education. Both plain sewing and fancy embroidery required considerable time and effort to learn. As a result, women took great pride in their work. Needlework skills might be used to earn a living, to embellish clothing and household furnishings, or to simply create objects of beauty.'

There is a needlework symposium in October, part of what appears to be a three year cycle of both exhibits and symposiums focused on needlework. I was lucky enough to attend in 2008, but dates in this year simply don't work for my real life."

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 14, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Needlepoint Events UPDATED

There's a new website in town--Needlepoint Events!  Vicky DeAngelis mentioned it on her blog tonight.
http://mostlyneedlepoint.com/so-whats-new-2/

The website is going to be a database of upcoming events and classes and will be searchable by location, shop, or teacher.  There is even a place for class reviews, trunk shows, and monthly clubs!
http://needlepoint.events

I don't know anything about the site except that it is based in Atlanta and is probably paid for via advertising. The site has been created by Mark Young of Labors of Love.  Thank you, Mark!

Hopefully Needlepoint Events will take off.  Let me tell you, I cannot wait to be able to stop updating the Classes and Events tab or the Monthly Clubs tab!  All this is a lot of work and blogs are not a suitable format for databases of classes and events.  The limitations of listing them on Blog is painfully obvious to me and probably obvious to you, too.  And then there's the issue of listing trunk shows, which I am opposed to as I believe that it simply trains stitchers to ship for the lowest price instead of supporting shops that are too small to afford deep discounts and frequent sales but which give stitchers endless help when they need it.

Stay tuned....

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 19, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Friday, September 19, 2014

Revisiting the Casbah

Terry Dryden has decided to rework an older design of hers called "Casbah."  She's added a lovely wide border, switched the colors, and is using totally different threads.  Fans of counted canvaswork will be thrilled to see her new work and fans of lovely color combos will be interested, too.  Let's hope this comes to a seminar near us soon!
http://www.terrydryden.com/-blog/2014/9/12/casbah-revisited.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 13, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Finishing Friday: Roses in Bloom

BeStitched proves with this very dimensional and embellished Melissa Shirley "Spring Bouquet" canvas made into a pillow that we don't just have to frame such pieces!  (Of course if you have pets or small kids on your couch or bed, you may have to keep this under lock and key for a few years.)
http://bestitchedneedlepoint.com/finished-fridays-needlepoint-pillow/

Lousie's has a colorful bob white (quail) canvas made up into a lovely pillow.   I really like the primitive feel of the design.  It just makes me happy.
http://louisesneedlwork.blogspot.com/2014/08/i-finally-got-one-of-my-stash-projects.html

Pocket Full of Stitches is showcasing a little bit of everything, perfect for those who don't really stitch flowers.
http://pocketfullofstitches.blogspot.com/2014/09/finishing.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright August 22, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Thursday, September 18, 2014

My Favorites from Destination Dallas

Now that the excitement of Destination Dallas is over and the shop owners and designers have dragged their bodies home, unpacked and slept for a week, it's time for a recap of all the things I thought interesting. This is me, mind you, with all my biases. There is something for everyone in the world of needlepoint so don't miss browsing the running dialogue on the Destination Dallas tab as shops and designers let us know what caught their eyes or what they are particularly proud of.  Here's the link.
http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com/p/destination-dallas.html

dede's Bear

My favorite new canvases are from dede Odgen and Vicki Sawyer.  Here is dede's "Snowy Nap Bear."  I love the realism of this piece.

Vicki Sawyer's Sheep Angel
Vicki Sawyer (a new artist whose work Melissa Shirley is reproducing on needlepoint canvas) has a fabulous sheep Nativity angel.  I love the whimsy of this piece.  You can see more of Vicki's work on Melissa's website.
http://melissashirleydesigns.com/gallery/?bsn=1

My Katie Boo for Leigh Designs

But more than animal canvases caught my eye.  My favorite new series is Leigh Designs' Lil Goblins.  I can't top what Leigh wrote about them--

"Our neighborhood kids are all grown up and gone. Regardless, every Halloween we decorate and have candy on hand -- and every Halloween the doorbell remains silent as the night moves on undisturbed. To remedy this pitiful scene, I created our own neighborhood kids. Now, on All Hallows Eve, the Lil’ Goblins stand up on our dining room table. Smiling, we happily devour the candy ourselves! There are eight spooky 6” tall designs on 18 mesh French Blue mono."

Of course I have to reveal I stitched Katie for Leigh and my friend Pat is going to stitch Janie.  My stitch guide is ready already but Pat won't start on my namesake with my trademark pony tail until October.  (Sorry, I write these weeks ahead of the publication date and Pat's started her Lil Goblin.  You can watch her blog stitch Janie at the second link below.)   I am pretty sure Sandy Arthur is going to stitch one as well so stay tuned for much stitch guide fun.
http://www.leighdesigns.com/Grp520x.html

http://needleartnut.blogspot.com


JT Morrow Geisha with Fans
My favorite new designer is JT Morrow.  JT has two wonderful geisha canvases.  The dancing geisha with fans is pictured above but you'll have to click on this link to see the graceful geisha with her umbrella.
http://nashvilleneedleworks.com/whats-new/

When it comes to books, I want to get my hot little hands on Lynda Richardson's first book, Stitches a la Carte.  Lynda is the genius behind Dreamhouse Ventures and her book sold out at Dallas.  Here's a sneak peek.  Doesn't it sound like a book with personality?  I get tired of the useful books full of stitch diagrams but no real glimpse of the author.  I use them all the time but I remember the great books about needlepoint that Sylvia Sidney and Mary Martin wrote in the 1970s.  This book might have both diagrams and soul.
http://needlepointland.com/2014/08/24/stitches-a-la-carte/

I need some of that hot pink Frye Werks!  It is called Super Pink.  Trust me, it'll jump out from the photos at you.
http://needlepointstudyhall.blogspot.com/2014/09/new-2014-fall-colors-and-threads-from.html

I liked seeing all the designer model photos that Erin took.  I'm not really interested in any of the projects but a good finisher works magic and there are some great display ideas here for those who don't have room for another pillow or picture.
http://needlepointland.com/2014/09/09/dallas-outtakes/

Everyone has their favorites from the show.  What's yours?  Post in the comments below.

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 10, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Missed the Christmas Finishing Deadline?

If you missed the Christmas finishing deadline at your local shop, Stitch By Stitch points out it is not the end of the world. Simply pick up a self-finishing piece and go to town like the ones from Lee that the shop has in stock right now. 
http://stitchbystitchlarchmontny.blogspot.com/2014/09/hello-stitchers_48.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 7, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Barbara Explains Ribbons

Those of you familiar with Barbara Elmore know she has several new lines of ribbons (distributed by Sundance Design, in case you want your shop to order for you).  In this blog tutorial she talks about how to use her ribbons with tips and tricks you can use on any brand of ribbons.  Thanks, Barbara!
http://stitchpography.blogspot.com/2014/08/a-tutorial-stitching-with-paint.html

Barbara also did an earlier, less thorough, ribbon tutorial.  Here it is if you want further information and inspiration.
http://stitchpography.blogspot.com/2014/01/see-whats-new.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright August 24, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Brenda's Laying Tools

Brenda wrote a little bit about the two types of laying tools she uses, which I thought folks would find interesting.  I use a trolley needle myself, except I wear it on my left thumb.  But I prefer shorter laying tools than the BLT.  A tekobari is more my style.  To each his/her own!  Actually, I think various types of laying tools work better or worse on certain types of threads and also in certain weathers.  What do you think?  Do you have favorites you always use?
http://brendasneedlepointstudio.blogspot.com/2014/09/laying-tools-which-do-you-prefer-91314.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 13, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Stitchable Pendants

Alex Paras Needlearts has something I've not seen before--stitchable pendants in acrylic or bamboo!  There's not much stitching room but I bet you could do some nice geometric shapes or an initial.
http://store.apneedlearts.com/stpe.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 1, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Monday, September 15, 2014

BREAKING NEWS: Tony Minieri Dot Com

Yes, it's finally happened. Tony Minieri has a website.
http://www.tonyminieri.com

You can see some of Tony's original designs, check his class schedule, read his bio, and check in on occasional blog postings.  There is a link to Tony's Pinterest page and a place to buy lovely chatelaines and scissor fobs.
http://www.pinterest.com/tonyminieri/

Sadly, you can't buy old class materials or see what stitch guides Tony can provide, but perhaps that will come in time.  The first step has been taken toward that goal, however, even if it is OUR goal, not Tony's.

Congratulations to Tony and Luis and their friends!

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 15, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Peter Ashe Stocking (Video)

If you are a fan of Peter Ashe canvases or Santas, you'll want to see the video Barbara's Needlepoint posted on Facebook showing the stocking that a customer stitched. Sorry it's sideways but this was the shop's first video and it is full of information about the threads and stitches used on this Santa stocking.
https://www.facebook.com/video.php?v=779322395444130&set=vb.107558659287177&type=2&theater&notif_t=notify_me

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 8, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Fair Winners

This is the time of year that there are many local and state fairs, many of which offer ribbons for needlework. I've collected quite a few Facebook photos of award-winning needlepoint that I thought Id share with you.  Here's a blue ribbon from the Minnesota state fair.  This is Sue Kerndt's "Holiday Patches" but the stitcher is unknown.
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10203670312432357&set=gm.715049981905496&type=1&theater

Mary Ann Saurino has won quite a few ribbons from the Minnesota state fair!
https://www.facebook.com/groups/NeedlepointNation/permalink/714893978587763/

Susanne is posting photos she took at the Kentucky state fair.  Stitchers are unknown.
https://www.facebook.com/groups/NeedlepointNation/permalink/714684945275333/

Brenda won a second place ribbon at the Texas state fair!  This piece is in honor of her mother.
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=265735670301898&set=a.114727428736057.1073741828.100005964012324&type=1&theater

Beth took a first at the Stark county fair!
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=787303984624669&set=gm.715712805172547&type=1&theater

https://www.facebook.com/groups/NeedlepointNation/permalink/717278091682685/

Summer took all sorts of ribbons with her Amanda Lawford Santa.  Applause!
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10202431101323189&set=gm.718293244914503&type=1&theater

Here are five Maryland state fair ribbon winner photos.  Use the side arrows to navigate.
https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10154568753820257&set=pcb.722213011189193&type=1&theater

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright August 26, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Threadaholic Alert: El Molino Rayon Thread

If you love threads, particularly rayon threads, you'll want to read what Jan has to say about Presencia's rayon thread called El Molino.  Like Jan, I adore Michelle at Come to the Point who carries the thread.  If you want to explore some of the threads she carries, the shop website is the second link below.
http://threadmedley.wordpress.com/2014/09/08/do-you-use-rayon-thread/

http://www.cometothepoint.com

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 8, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

The Backside of Miniature Rugs

Natalia posted an interesting article about why she uses tent stitches (mostly continental, but never basketweave) when she stitches a miniature rug. She feels the tent stitch makes for a neater background when working on such a small scale.
http://scarletsailsminiatures.blogspot.com/2014/09/needletherapy-tutorial-how-to-make-neat.html

Her current rug commission (below) is on 40 count silk gauze and includes a very intricate pattern, probably not suitable for basketweave anyway.  I always expected some differences between stitching on needlepoint canvas, congress cloth and silk gauze but I never expected that using tent stitches would neaten up the background!  Still, Natalie points out this works for her and won't necessarily work for other stitchers.
http://scarletsailsminiatures.blogspot.com/2014/08/french-savonnerie-rug-in-112th-scale.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 1, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Tiny Little Stitched Houses

Stephanie has just posted lots and lots of photos of some of Squiggee's tiny 3-d houses. Her SWAN stitching group has been working a lot of these lately.  They are charmers! 
http://stephsstitching.blogspot.com/2014/09/squiggee-consolidated.html

Squiggee isn't the only needlepoint company to do these 3-D houses.  Susan Roberts has some wonderful buildings.
http://www.susanrobertsneedlepoint.com/designs-by-category/category/mini-house.html

So does dede Odgen, although I think hers are larger.  They certainly are very detailed!
http://www.dedesneedleworks.com/special.html

Know of another designer who does 3-D buildings?  Add their name in Comments below or send me a quick email at chillyhollowathotmaildotcom and I'll update this list for you.  After all, the architect in us needs to build a house with needle and thread!

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 3, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Nothing Screams Easter Like Sugar Eggs

Nothing says Easter to me more than sugar eggs.  We had these as children, covered in colored sugar and icing and edible if you didn't mind they'd been sitting out for a month.  Later on chocolate eggs became popular, which is understandable as they taste so much better.  Still, nothing beats a sugar egg for display!
http://ridgewoodneedlepoint.blogspot.com/2014/08/sugar-egg-jane-stitched-by-this.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright August 30, 014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Friday, September 12, 2014

Colorful Orna

Orna Willis is back from teaching at the ANG Seminar.  Check out the wonderful photographs of her classes and students!   She is a master of color and it looks to me she has taught her students a lot.
http://ornadesign.blogspot.com/2014/09/im-back.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright September 2, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.

Finishing Friday: How Does She Find the Time?!

Stephanie shows off KH's  finishing --check out the Bargello tomato!-- and then tells us KH has a family and a full time job.  I think I might hate KH, when I'm not admiring her work, that is.
http://stephsstitching.blogspot.com/2014/08/hope-you-think-it-was-worth-wait.html

By the way, Pocket Full of Stitches and Ridgewood Needlepoint are showing off models from their trunk shows.  The variety of finishing and designs they show is terrific!
http://pocketfullofstitches.blogspot.com/2014/08/a-bradley-trunk-show-models.html

http://ridgewoodneedlepoint.blogspot.com/2014/08/now-thru-labor-day-we-will-be-offering.html

Written by Jane/Chilly Hollow
Blogging at http://chillyhollownp.blogspot.com
and at http://chstitchguides.blogspot.com
© Copyright August 14, 2014 Jane M. Wood. All rights reserved.